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Chicago Like a Local Blog

Unique perspectives on the city from the people who live here.

Tag - Chicago A-Z

It’s curious to think that in the mid-19th century, the Union Stock Yard Gate once was the last thing that millions of animals saw as they were led to their slaughter for use as meat products and various other sundry goods. Today, visitors to this city landmark will only encounter rumbling trucks belonging to nearby companies such as the Royal Envelope Corporation, Aramark Uniform Services and the Superior Nut & Candy Company.

The design competition for the Chicago Tribune Tower was one of the most celebrated international architectural competitions of the 20th century. On June 10, 1922, the Chicago Tribune announced that they entries would be welcome from anywhere in the world. The prize? $50,000. Over the coming months, they received over 260 entries. In the end, the winning entry was a formidable design proffered by John Mead Howells and Raymond Hood.

Anchoring Andersonville, Chicago's historic Swedish neighborhood, on a vibrant portion of Clark Street, the Swedish American Museum celebrates the accomplishments of Swedes who came to America over the past several centuries and settled in Chicago. Andersonville itself is one of Chicago's great walking neighborhoods. Plan a trip today, and include the museum on your itinerary!

The colorful Ravenswood corridor in Lincoln Square hugs the Metra right-of-away as it makes its way north through a clutch of North Side Chicago neighborhoods. Many of the former industrial buildings along this street now house a range of booming businesses (including craft breweries!), and spending an afternoon in these parts is quite pleasant. Why not take a short trip and visit a few of our favorite Ravenswood gems. Let's get started!

Buckingham Fountain Chicago Grant Park

Over the past 170 years, Chicago has played host to a range of royalty from all over the world. One of the more momentous visits was by Queen Elizabeth II on July 26, 1959, when she arrived by yacht for a whirlwind 14-hour tour of the city led by then Mayor Richard J. Daley, Governor William Stratton and other prominent persons. The next time you plan an outing to Chicago's lakefront, visit the historic spot in Grant Park yourself, aptly named "Queen's Landing."

P is for the Palmer House Peacocks: Chicago A–Z

Tuesday, December 6, 2016 12:00 AM by Max Grinnell

Palmer House Peacocks

Every major American city has a jewelry story that has appealed to high society, and Chicago is no exception. The city's first jewelry store was run by one Elijah Peacock, which he opened in 1837, the same year Chicago was established as a city. In a very real sense it predated the establishment of a nouveau riche class of Chicago residents. Nevertheless, the store served members of the moneyed elite, who stepped into the store through a set of doors that exemplified the riches inside.

O is for Oak Street Beach: Exploring Chicago A to Z

Thursday, November 3, 2016 12:00 AM by Max Grinnell

Oak Street Beach

Oak Street Beach, with its nearly mile-and-a-half stretch of sand and shore and sights to see, is a beautiful place in any season. It's a perennial favorite of Chicagoans, who easily spend a few hours here just taking in the sights (natural or otherwise). Summer may be the time when the masses come out to swim in the lake, walk or bike along the Lakefront Trail, enjoy drinks and food al fresco and watch fellow beachgoers and passersby. But any time is the perfect time to check out one particularly noteworthy aspect in this area east of Lake Shore Drive: an ambitious, and massive, piece of public art.

N is for Newberry Library: Exploring Chicago A–Z

Wednesday, October 12, 2016 12:00 AM by Max Grinnell

Newberry Library
If you stand in Washington Square Park as the leaves begin to fall, you can look through the thin spider-web like branches of the trees to get a glimpse of the Newberry Library. Its ponderous Romanesque form was completed in 1893, the same year Chicago saw the World's Columbian Exposition welcome millions of visitors to Jackson Park on the city's South Side.

Maxwell Street Market Chicago

If you can smell the nopales (cactus) tacos and hear the cry of vendors hawking everything from car tires to pungent spices, you're probably close to the Maxwell Street Market, which is one of Chicago's greatest treasures. Located less than a mile southwest of The Loop, the weekly Maxwell Street Market has been an institution for over 130 years and a place for new arrivals from all over the world to set up their wares to sell every Sunday from 7am to 3pm, come rain or shine.

Lincoln Park Conservatory Chicago 

In the Victorian Age, Chicagoans became quite fascinated with assemblages built of iron and glass that gave shelter to a staggering array of plant life for general consumption in any season, no matter how dire the weather. Built between 1890 and 1895, the Lincoln Park Conservatory continues to offer visitors and locals ample reason to make a pilgrimage to the Lincoln Park neighborhood to experience their four wonderful display halls.

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