Kahn had invented a new way to construct buildings. They could not only be taller than ever before, but by varying the design they could be different shapes, and not just big boxes. Willis Tower is just such a variation, it is similar in design to the John Hancock in that it also uses giant tubes. However this time, instead of using X-bracing, he bundled tubes together at different heights. Just like if you have a handful of straws, one straw on its own can be bent easily. If you have 4 or 6 together then it becomes much harder to bend. This is the basic concept behind Willis tower’s structure. Virtually every building that has been built since the 60's that is over 40 stories uses Khan's designs. "The technical man must not be lost in his own technology; he must be able to appreciate life, and life is art, drama, music, and most importantly, people." Fazlur Khan - @city_in_a_garden here #takingoverchoosechicago! #mychicagopix #chicago

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Each week, we feature one Instagram photographer who will get to feature their photos and videos on Choose Chicago's Instagram account all week long, part of our new #TakingOverChooseChicago series. This week, we chose Graeme of City in a Garden. Enjoy!

Kate Buckingham and her brother would often travel to Europe and she wanted to bring something of the grand fountains she had admired in Europe back to Chicago. The Buckingham fountain is modeled after the Latona Fountain at Versailles. It is a representation of lake Michigan, each seahorse represents a state that border the lake (Illinois, Indiana, Michigan and Wisconsin). French sculptor, Marcel F Loyau created the statues. The fountain operates from May 9 (opening day this year) until Mid October, it runs from 8.am until 11 pm. The best time to go (I think) is at night. Every hour on-the-hour there is a water show which lasts for 20 minutes. At night it also includes lights and music, during the show the three water pumps push more than 14,000 gallons of water per minute through the water jets. - @city_in_a_garden here #takingoverchoosechicago! #mychicagopix #chicago

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Hello I am @city_in_a_garden and I am #takingoverchoosechicago this week. For those that don’t know me my favorite things to do is to try to tell the story behind the photo. I will be including extra information along with the photos. Fazlur Khan was a great Chicagoan who most people have never heard of. If you have been to Chicago, or live here, you are familiar with his work. Khan was a structural engineer who pioneered the modern skyscraper. Fazlur Khan was born in 1929 in Dhaka, Bangladesh. He received a Civil engineering degree from University a Dhaka. He also received scholarship funding which allowed him to travel to the United states. He traveled to the University of Illinois where he received a Masters in Structural Engineering. In 1955 he started working for SOM (Skidmore, Owings and Merrill) in Chicago. Here and around the world he worked on construction projects such as the Inland Steel Building, John Hancock Center and The Sears Tower just to name a few. He was called the "Einstein of Structural Engineering" by some.

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Hello I am @city_in_a_garden and I am #takingoverchoosechicago this week. For those that don’t know me my favorite things to do is to try to tell the story behind the photo. I will be including extra information along with the photos. The Lurie Garden was built as a tribute to Chicago’s motto, “Urbs in Horto”, or City in a Garden. Designed by Kathryn Gustafson, Piet Oudolf, and Robert Israel, it was named after Ann Lurie who donated $10 million for its upkeep and maintenance. The garden is divided into four main parts: a dark plate, a light plate, the boardwalk, and a shoulder hedge (The City of Big Shoulders). Just east of the boardwalk is the dark plate; a wilderness of wild flowers and plants. The flowers here are shade-loving with muted colors. This represents Chicago of the past. The other side of the boardwalk is the light plate. It is more formal than the dark and filled with bright sun loving plants. This represents Chicago’s present and future. The boardwalk down the center of the garden runs parallel to the original lake retaining wall. Its wooden planks recall the wooden sidewalks used before the great fire to raise people out of the marsh. While the stream running down the side of the boardwalk is a nod to Chicago’s river and the lake. #mychicagopix #chicago

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So how deep do you think the fountain is? Well, the answer is 3 feet. You may think it is only about 1 inch deep but in fact the stones you are standing on are raided above a tank below. The reason for this is stillness deeper water is much calmer than shallow. The same company that built the fountains at the Bellagio Las Vegas designed Crown fountains water systems. When they constructed the fountain they wanted it to be interactive. It has been a huge success with both the young and old. Certain safety precautions were put in place. First hygiene, the water is filtered so much in the fountain it is in fact cleaner then the water in your home. Second the water spout, the main concern was would it knock over children? A great deal of time was spent placing children in front of the spout and seeing if it pushed them over. (No children were harmed in the making of this fountain) - @city_in_a_garden here #TakingOverChooseChicago! #mychicagopix #chicago

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Hello I am @city_in_a_garden and I am #takingoverchoosechicago this week. For those that don't know me my favorite things to do is to try to tell the story behind the photo. I will be including extra information along with the photos. Chicago Federal Center is made up of three buildings. A flat one (Loop Post office), a wide one (US Courthouse), and one tall one ( Kluczynski Federal Building). Each building was design by the world renowned architect Ludwig Mies van der Rohe. The Center was constructed from 1964-1973, and replaced the old federal building. Until this point almost all government buildings were of Greek or Roman inspired design, so Mies van der Rohe's vision was a significant shift in design. Mies van der Rohe had two favorite sayings: "Less is more" and "God is in the details". Architecture up till then had been mostly decorative with thick heavy stone and ornaments. His vision was to simplify design to its purest elements. His buildings celebrated the space, and not the mass of the building. While at first glance they may look plain, they do have decorations and design elements if you look for them. Stay tuned to hear about them in my next 2 posts! #mychicagopix #chicago

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Chicago Federal Center - Above is a picture of the Loop Post Office. The next time you find yourself in the Federal Building Plaza, be sure to face the Post Office and look at the ground. You’ll notice that the seams in the granite outside line up with the edges of the windows in the building. Now look up and see that the lights too, line up with the windows and seams in the granite. Now turn 180 degrees and look at the Courthouse building. The floor, supports, windows and lights all line up exactly with the Post Office. If you turn another 90 degrees to face the other Federal building you will see the same thing. All three buildings are in perfect alignment with each other. Amazing! Furthermore, the fact that this was done by hand without computers is even more amazing to me! - @city_in_a_garden here #takingoverchoosechicago! #mychicagopix #chicago

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