'David Bowie Is' lead

Autumn in Chicago - cooling temperatures, changing trees, football, and museums?

When thinking about fall in the city, art might not be the first thing that comes to mind, but September is one of the busiest and active months for museums - almost all major museums are opening a new exhibit this month.

Learn about five of the exhibits opening during the month of September, as well as two exhibits not to miss before they close.

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DPAM

DePaul Art Museum, "Ink, Paper, Politics: WPA-Era Printmaking from the Needles Collection"
Opens Sept. 11

Time Out Chicago recently named DPAM the most underrated musuem in Chicago, and it's living up to its name with a unique featured exhibit of Depression-era art. The Works Progress Administration (WPA) gave federal funds to artists during the Great Depression, leading to the creation of everything from fiction to fine art. Prints from artists such as Fletcher Martin, Edward Arthur Wilson and Harry Sternberg explore the social issues of their time in their work.

Above: Harry Sternberg, Steel Mills (Smoke Stacks), 1937. Screenprint. Collection of the DePaul Art Museum, gift of Belverd Needles Jr. and Marian Powers Needles.

 

AIC

Art Institute of Chicago, "Photography Is"
Opens Sept. 18

The beginning of the museum's nine-month series, "Photography Is" celebrates the 40th anniversary of photography at the museum, as well as the fifth anniversary of photography in the Modern Wing. The series begins with exhibits of two photographers in the Modern Wing, Sarah Charlesworth and August Sander. "Sarah Charlesworth: Stills" exhibits a set enlarged, cropped news photographs of individuals jumping or falling from tall buildings. A group of seven of these photos were originally exhibited in 1980, but the complete series of 14 photographs have never been exhibited. "Stills" is the first U.S. museum solo show of Charlesworth's work in 15 years.

Above: Sarah Charlesworth. Patricia Cawlings, Los Angeles, 1980, printed 2012, No. 10 of 14 from the series Stills. The Art Institute of Chicago, Krueck Foundation and Photography Gala Funds,2013.129. © Estate of Sarah Charlesworth. Courtesy the Estate of Sarah Charlesworth and Maccarone.; Sarah Charlesworth. Unidentified Man, Ontani Hotel, Los Angeles, 1980, printed 2012, No. 14 of 14 from the series Stills.The Art Institute of Chicago, promised gift of Liz and Eric Lefkofsky. © Estate of Sarah Charlesworth. Courtesy the Estate of Sarah Charlesworth and Maccarone.; Sarah Charlesworth. Unidentified Woman, Hotel Corona de Aragon, Madrid, 1980, printed 2012, No. 1 of 14 from the seriesStills. The Art Institute of Chicago, promised gift of Liz and Eric Lefkofsky. © Estate of Sarah Charlesworth. Courtesy the Estate of Sarah Charlesworth and Maccarone.

 

NMMA

National Musuem of Mexican Art, "Rito y Recuerdo"
Opens Sept. 19

The Pilsen museum's permanent collection is currently closed through December, but NMA's annual Day of the Dead exhibit warrants a trip despite the absence. Dia de los Muertos is a Mexican tradition of honoring and remembering the dead, and the museum's exhibit does so with a traditional Otomí altar and a burial mound offering (ofrenda-túmulo) from the State of Mexico as well as installations and other art from more than 60 artists from Mexico and the U.S. Chicagoans with work on display include Rita Arias-Jirasek's installation for author Gabriel García Márquez, Marcos Raya, Héctor Barrón and more.

José Alfonso Fernández Soteno, Pot with Skulls and Arch  (detail)/ Olla con calacas y arco, 2008, polychrome ceramic and wire / cerámica policromada y alambre, 46" x 22" x 22", National Museum of Mexican Art Permanent Collection, 2010.29; Alejandro Nava, The Swing / El columpio, 1990, oil on canvas / óleo sobre lienzo, 57" x 51 ½", National Museum of Mexican Art Permanent Collection, 1990.82, Gift of the artist

 

MCA

Museum of Contemporary Art, "David Bowie Is"
Opens Sept. 23

The MCA easily has the most-hyped exhibit of the fall: A 400-object retrospective of the incredible career of David Bowie. The exhibit will feature everything from Bowie's Ziggy Stardust bodysuits to handwritten lyrics, set designs to album art work and more. Along with the extensive exhibit, the museum has planned a variety of events related to the exhibit with everything from the Chicago brother-and-sister duo White Mystery covering Bowie to a talk of of Montreal's Kevin Barnes on the artist later in the fall. Tickets can be purchased with admission, but it's best to reserve your space and time or online prior to your visit.

Quilted two-piece suit, 1972. Designed by Freddie Burretti for the Ziggy Stardust tour. Courtesy of The David Bowie Archive. Image © Victoria and Albert Museum.; Ice-blue suit, 1972. Designed by Freddie Burretti for the Life on Mars? video. Courtesy of The David Bowie Archive.  Image © Victoria and Albert Museum.; Asymmetric knitted bodysuit, 1973. Designed by Kansai Yamamoto for the Aladdin Sanetour. Courtesy of The David Bowie Archive. Image © Victoria and Albert Museum.

 

Smart

Smart Museum, "Carved, Cast, Crumpled: Sculpture All Ways"
Opens Sept. 27

University of Chicago's museum usually houses a few different temporary exhibits as well as a permanent collection, but the entire space is being taken over by the sculpture exhibit. Celebrating the museum's 40th anniversary, the exhibit is composed completely of three-dimensional works (and a few drawings by sculptures), including a piece that was part of the museum's first exhibit in 1974. Sculptures from contemporary artists such as John Chamberlain and Robert Irwin will be exhibited along with small-scale work from Auguste Rodin, Jacques Lipchitz, ancient Chinese mingqi tomb and European bronze work. The exhibit promises to be impressive - the Smart Museum is closed for the entire month to prepare for the opening.

Installation view of the Smart's 1974 exhibition of sculpture from the The Joel Starrels, Jr. Memorial Collection, which inspired Carved, Cast, Crumpled: Sculpture All Ways.

Top photo: Album cover shoot for Aladdin Sane, 1973. Design: Brian Duffy and Celia Philo; make up: Pierre La Roche. Photo: Brian Duffy. Photo Duffy © Duffy Archive & The David Bowie Archive