Chicago has a vibrant music scene. Here are some of the best places to catch a concert with a group.

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If you're in the mood for some live music, check out any of these hot spots around the city for a memorable evening.


The Chicago Theatre

175 N. State St., 312-462-6300, thechicagotheatre.com
Chicago's oldest surviving movie palace theatre, this grand dame located in the heart of the Loop does not go unnoticed — the colorful sign and six story marquee that spell out CHICAGO shine brightly on State Street every night. And taking the stage? Some of the biggest acts in music. From Aretha Franklin to Alicia Keys, Lyle Lovett to The Lumineers, national and international stars of all genres pack the beautiful 3,600 auditorium.

For groups, check out the venue tour to stand on the very stage as these top entertainers, then go behind the scenes for a peek at the autographed backstage wall and explore the beautiful Baroque interiors.


Buddy Guy's Legends

700 S. Wabash Ave., 312-427-1190, buddyguy.com
A premier blues club since 1989, Buddy Guy's Legends has distinguished itself with an innovative scheduling of local, national and international blues acts. The stage has welcomed some of the world's most talented musicians, including Willie Dixon, Albert Collins, Stevie Ray Vaughn and, of course, Buddy Guy himself.

Legends can also be found on the walls, which are filled with pieces of Blues history, original artwork, records, rare photos and Grammys, along with personal items from some of the world's most influential performers.

Apart from the raw talent on stage and the veritable museum of music history plastered on the walls, Buddy Guy's offers guests a fun, vibrant atmosphere that keeps going all night long. It is one of the best places in Chicago to enjoy the finest blues all week long, along with delicious southern Cajun soul food and an engaging crowd of music lovers.


House of Blues

329 N. Dearborn St., 312-923-2000, houseofblues.com/chicago
Located in the historic Marina City complex on the Chicago River, the House of Blues has been a staple of the Chicago music scene for nearly 20 years. It was modeled after the "Estavovski" Opera House in Prague, a nod to the historical musicians that came before and a promise of high quality acoustics for future concertgoers. The House of Blues offers a unique musical experience, especially if you get a seat in the exclusive Opera Boxes, which offer spectacular views of the stage and venue. The venue keeps with tradition, openly displaying the "Crazy Quilt" and keeping a metal box of mud from the Delta Mississippi under the stage.

The House of Blues has welcomed legendary acts like The Who and Al Green, as well as contemporary performers like Jurassic 5. A concert at this iconic Chicago music venue is one you won't soon forget.

The Metro

3730 N. Clark St., 773-549-4140, metrochicago.com
This northside concert hall is where hundreds of alternative, indie rock, pop and soul acts on the verge of making it big have performed over the years. It has served as a platform for emerging artists since 1982, and has established itself as a cutting edge music venue. It welcomes some of the best local, regional and national artists to the city, as well as tens of thousands of music lovers.

Underneath the Metro is a darker space called Smart Bar that features up-and-coming electronic talent. Past performers have included Frankie Knuckles, Paul Oakenfold and Richie Hawtin, among others.

The venue continues to evolve with the ever-changing music scene, providing music enthusiasts with a wide variety of new talent and an exciting vibe that keeps people coming back again and again.

Lincoln Hall

2424 N. Lincoln Ave., 773-525-2501, lincolnhallchicago.com
A relative newcomer to the live music scene in Chicago, Lincoln Hall opened in 2009 and has quickly become an elite concert venue. It offers great viewing from all areas of the hall, as well as an excellent sound system and acoustics. This venue hosts indie, mainstream rock and pop artists, ranging from regional performers to national acts.

For avid, passionate fans, the floor level is the place to be, as that gets you close to the action and within earshot of the artists. If you're in the mood to just sit back and soak in the tunes, the balcony is the best option, where there is less of a crowd but the stage is still clearly visible.


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